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Diabetes + Hyperbarics


A close-up view of a pair of hands, and they are pricking their finger to check their blood sugar.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body turns food into energy. According to the data released by the CDC, "More than 37 million US adults have diabetes, and 1 in 5 of them don’t know they have it" (What Is Diabetes?, 2022). These numbers do not include children and teens. Diabetes is also listed as being the seventh leading cause of death in the US.


Currently, there is no known cure for diabetes. However, recent research has been released in which HBOT is being shown to help alleviate the symptoms of this condition. Find a direct link to the research here.


Per the International Hyperbarics Association, studies have demonstrated the following benefits of HBOT for diabetes:


Improve Blood Chemistry Profile:

  • Fasting blood sugar

  • Hemoglobin HbA1C

  • Lipid profiles

Advance Glycemic Control:

  • Increases pancreatic islets of Langerhans

  • Improves insulin sensitivity

  • Increases skeletal muscle reception of glucose

Decrease cardiovascular risk:

  • Promotes long-term blood pressure control

  • Attenuates metabolic syndrome

  • Reduces risk of sudden heart attack due to ventricular arrythmias

Stimulate Angiogenesis & Reduce Inflammation:

  • Improves brain function and reduces risk of stroke

  • Enhances heart function and reduces risk of heart attack

  • Reduces risk of diabetic retinopathy

  • Decreases risk of diabetic neuropathy

  • Minimizes risk of diabetic nephropathy

  • Combats cellulitis

Enhance Natural/External Healing:

  • Proliferates epithelization

  • Promotes closure of non-healing wounds

  • Ameliorates ulcerations

  • Reduces risk of amputation

Give us a call at 515-421-4002 to learn more about hyperbarics and diabetes, or to get scheduled!


References:


International Hyperbarics Association. (2019). Diabetes & Hyperbarics [Brochure]. International Hyperbarics Association.


What is Diabetes? (2022, July 7). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/diabetes.html



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